Homemade Raisins – Spend With Pennies


For young home cooks, teaching kids how to make raisins is a fun, easy project.

Making homemade raisins is easy and no special tools (or food dehydrator) are needed.

The texture of these little homemade gems is different than store bought, they’re slightly chewy and almost candy-like in flavor.

Raisins baked on a parchment lined baking sheet

Easy Homemade Snack

Add a great sweet and chewy kick to cookies, granola, and trail mix! Green, purple, or black seedless grapes get transformed into little jewel-colored bursts of sweetness! Totally easy to make and they can be totally organic!

  • These homemade raisins use just two ingredients and a few simple steps!
  • Homemade raisins are a healthy, portable snack. 
  • Or add them to oatmeal, granola, or granola bars for an extra sweet & juicy surprise!
  • Enjoy these sweet bites for up to 2 weeks in the fridge.

Ingredients to make homemade raisins

Ingredients & Variations

GRAPES: Always select grapes that are full and plump and smell clean and sweet, regardless of their color. Seedless grapes are best, but any grape will do as long as they are about the same size with intact skins.

VINEGAR: For this recipe, vinegar is simply the means to cleanse any pesticides or wax that was added to the grapes to protect them during shipping.

Grapes rinsed in a strainer

How to Make Raisins

It’s simple and fun to make homemade raisins:

  1. Clean & trim grapes. Prepare an ice bath with vinegar.
  2. Boil grapes in water (per the recipe below). Drain well.
  3. Spread grapes on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.
  4. Bake in a ‘slow’ oven until dried, about 12 to 18 hours.
  5. Store cooled raisins in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

Did you know?!

Blanching grapes helps to remove any waxes that are on the grapes and helps to break the skins. When the skin is broken, the grapes can release moisture easier which helps them to dehydrate faster.

Homemade Raisins baked on a baking sheet

Tips for the Best Raisins

  • Ensure the grapes are seedless. Green or purple grapes work.
  • Blanching grapes removes any waxes that are on the grapes and helps to break the skins. When the skin is broken, the grapes can release moisture easier which helps them to dehydrate faster.
  • The time listed in the recipe is an estimate and will vary based on the size of your grapes and personal preference.
  • We have tried both halved and whole grapes, I prefer the whole grapes. Halved grapes are a bit chewier in texture.
  • Line the pan with parchment so the raisins don’t stick.
  • If using raisins in a recipe, you can plump them up by placing them in water for about 15 minutes.
  • Store them in an airtight container to keep them fresh.
  • Add to cookies, salads, or cinnamon rolls!

Did you make these Homemade Raisins? Be sure to leave a rating and a comment below! 

Homemade Raisins

With only 2 easy ingredients, these juicy gems are a perfectly portable and healthy snack!


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  • Preheat the oven to 190°F.

  • Remove grapes from the stems. Combine the vinegar with water and ice to fill a large bowl.

  • Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add grapes. Boil 30 seconds and drain well.

  • Place grapes into the ice bath for 2 minutes. Drain well.

  • Dab grapes dry and cut in half if desired (I prefer to leae them whole). Place in a single layer on a parchment-lined baking sheet.

  • Allow grapes to dry for 12-18 hours in the oven, stirring a couple of times.

  • Store in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

  • Ensure the grapes are seedless. Green or purple grapes work.
  • Blanching grapes removes any waxes that are on the grapes and helps to break the skins. When the skin is broken, the grapes can release moisture easier which helps them to dehydrate faster.
  • The time listed in the recipe is an estimate and will vary based on the size of your grapes and personal preference.
  • We have tried both halved and whole grapes, I prefer the whole grapes. Halved grapes are a bit chewier in texture. 
  • Line the pan with parchment so the raisins don’t stick

Calories: 78, Carbohydrates: 21g, Protein: 1g, Fat: 1g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g, Monounsaturated Fat: 1g, Sodium: 2mg, Potassium: 217mg, Fiber: 1g, Sugar: 18g, Vitamin A: 75IU, Vitamin C: 4mg, Calcium: 11mg, Iron: 1mg

(Nutrition information provided is an estimate and will vary based on cooking methods and brands of ingredients used.)

Course Snack

Cuisine American

grapes in a strainer and raisins in a dish with writing

 

Homemade raisins on a baking sheet with a title
A glass container of homemade raisins with a title
Homemade raisins in a glass container with a title





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